Ep. 40 - Podcast Thumbnail

#40 – The Future of Porn

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Ep. 40 - Podcast Thumbnail

The advancements happening in the porn industry these days are drastic. With the social currency yielded by social media, people have become more vulnerable and, as a result, cultivate the desire to make content where they can gather recognition and validation from others.

In this episode, Sammy and Andrew give us more insights into the inevitable cultural direction that porn is headed to, compounded with the pressure to be a certain way online, given the consistently meteoric upsurge of deviating standards, values, and expectations that the online community is dictating.

Are you alarmed when you see in plain sight the paradigm shift in pornography and where it is headed? If so, then it’s crucial to have a profound awareness that it’s not about the emerging platforms, but the phenomena behind it.

  • Porn 2.0 or self-produced porn
  • Factors that cultivate the desire to create pornographic content
  • The new direction of porn
  • A new platform for sexual content
  • The different mentalities toward porn
  • The reasons for the inevitable change in pornography consumption
  • Pornified Culture: ‘Of course’ response
  • Consequences behind the new direction of porn

Episode Transcript:

Sammy Uyama: Hello, ladies and gentlemen. Welcome to another episode of Love, Life, and Legacy. It’s me, Sammy Uyama, together with my partner in crime. How are you doing good, Sir?

Andrew Love: Your partner in crime has a name, Sir. And his name, Sir, is Andrew Love I. All right. And he’s doing great. I would love for the rest of this podcast to refer to myself as ‘He’. In the third person. If you don’t mind.

Sammy Uyama: So, how is he doing today, then? 

Andrew Love: He’s I. Yeah. We were on good terms. Me and he. 

Sammy Uyama: Alright. It’s good to hear. So, yeah. We’re here for another episode. And this is actually when I’m, I’ve been eager to do because it’s been something that I’ve been thinking about for a while. And just doing over. And this is a good opportunity for Andrew, you and I. Excuse me. For Andrew and I. If he doesn’t mind, to, to, to kind of go through together and just like kind of figure out our thoughts. And also, sharing it with you guys. It helps us figure out what is it that we’re actually like trying to process, because then. What I’ve been thinking about is like the future of the porn industry. And just knowing what’s becoming popular now and the implications of that. And, and what that means for the future. And this is, this topic that’s has been going through my mind based on what I’ve been reading and what I, what I know from previously. And I was talking to Andrew, right? We’re, right before recording, we’re talking about a little bit. And some of it, you know, you’ve already known for a while. Some of it you’re, you were hearing about for the first time. And it’s pretty alarming. When you actually like get the words out and, and look at with plain sight like what’s going on. So, that’s we want to talk about.

Andrew Love: Yeah. So, Sammy was enlightening me about an entire platform that is emerging. That I had no idea about. I could see that that’s where porn is going, right? But I didn’t know that it was so well developed, and how cleverly it was developed. And so, we wanted to get into what this platform is. But, we just didn’t want it. The point is not the name of this platform, because it won’t be the last. Like if we said, “Social media as a problem.” It doesn’t matter what. If it’s Facebook or Instagram or Pinterest or Reddit. It’s like, you know, they’re all in the same genre of causing issues. So, same with this platform. It’s, it’s a big one. And it’s growing, but there will be more. So, it’s just more the phenomena that’s taking place. And so.

Sammy Uyama: Yes. Yes. That’s the important thing. Because like, exactly you said that the platforms platform they come and go, but the phenomena behind it. Now, that you don’t go backwards, right? You only develop more and more. And this is clearly the direction that porn is growing. And it’s really interesting. The convergence of seeing it actually happening in real time versus this is something you’ve been talking about for a while. Which is like, the, what’s like the, the self production. Like self produced porn. How would you describe it?

Andrew Love: Oh. People were calling it porn 2.0. But it’s basically, yeah, when the consumer becomes the creator. It’s when you start to participate in the porn that you’re watching. And so, it’s just kind of natural, because it’s hard to kind of differentiate between the screen life and your real life. And when you get caught up in the screen life you might have, you’ve kind of participated, right? Like when you play a video game. Nobody likes watching video games. If that’s all we knew, about, oh, you know, let the professionals play the video games and we just watch them. Yeah, but compared to playing video games, it’s like it’s a whole another experience. Right? And so that’s, that’s what’s happening with porn is people used to just watch it. And now, they’re creating it because of the you know, technological advancements of fancy camera phones and fast Wi Fi. So, but I didn’t know. Like, Sammy, before you told me like I, I was, I’m, you kind of blindsided me with this information. Because I had no idea it was already this far. I was speaking in terms of like, “Wow, it’s inevitable.” But I was thinking like, you know, some long years of time down the line. Not now.

Sammy Uyama: It’s, maybe, it’s not a topic of this episode. But one part of what you just said, it’s kind of stuck with me that I’m, I, doesn’t really make sense to me. So, but maybe if it’s shorter in common. So, it’s like, the idea that, if, if create the consumers become the creators, then it’s like, the implication of that it’s like you’re watching porn then, there’s like it cultivates the desire to create that kind of content. Which I think, that is one direction. But, that’s, that part’s a little bit than where I’ve been recognizing. People, what I’ve been seeing is people have been producing their own like sexual content. But, it’s much more simply motivated. It’s like the, you know, there’s less financial incentives involved. And that’s, that seems to be what more, what I’m recognizing.

Andrew Love: But, there’s always something more to it than that. There’s status. There’s recognition, right? There’s getting validation from peers. It’s what, is the social currency of social media is likes. And this is the problem, right? For everybody out there, I, you know, this is, I forgot what month it is. I almost said it’s January. It’s September 20 something.

Sammy Uyama: It’s probably like that. Hasn’t it?

Andrew Love: Just September 22nd, I think. And recently, I just watched the Social Dilemma, the documentary on Netflix. Not a huge fan of Netflix or documentaries. Because a lot of times, they’re just completely biased and tell you one side of the story. But this one I felt was compelling, because it just hits on so many points about the damage that this social currency does to the human mind, and heart, and soul. And how it, like, we can say it all day. And almost the more that we say it, the more detach, we used, it feels, right? When we’re like, “Oh, you know, if you watch porn. You start to feel more isolated.” I know that to be true. And we’ve seen it across the board. But it’s almost like, it becomes a platitude, the more that we say it. But then, when you see the statistics of suicide rates going up. You see all this stuff, it becomes very real, right? And so, what I’m saying with this, with this thing that you’re talking about. This platform. Money is a great, you know, enticing reason to keep going, but it’s not it’s not the motivation. People at the end of the day, just want other people to love them. Right? And to give them acknowledgement and all this. And if you can make money at the same time, then fantastic. Because it’s not, it’s not a media, would, that encourages you to go out and kill puppies or something like that. It’s, it’s much more personal, right? It’s encouraging you to become very vulnerable and sell your vulnerability, right? Sell access to your, your soul, in a sense, right? So, there’s more to it than just money. There’s always, just like, in social media, there’s like, they’re always trying to incentivize you to stick around. So, this one, yeah, need incentive but it’s not the reason. To me, to me.

Sammy Uyama: Makes sense. We’re on the same page. I want to take that back. Because that, we’ve been talking about like, okay, self produced porn to porn 2.0. And I think, for some people that either doesn’t really have much context, so it makes sense. Or it seems like, really alarming. And just, like, really sudden, and extreme, right? And so, I want to, like, kind of bring some context to this whole thing. And, you know, typically, porn, it’s been, it’s run by an industry. And there’s gatekeepers to it. Where, you know, it’s like, there’s a lot of equipment involved. Studios, lighting, cameras, there’s directors, there’s film crew. And, you know, to get into porn, it’s a, you had to go into the industry, right? And you had to deal with, you know, all the ups and downs that come along with it. Its just part of the work and is the same with everything, right? The book publishing was the same. Movies was same. And in all areas, right? There’s just been this trend to, to self sufficiency. So, like with, with YouTube, it’s totally flipping Hollywood on its head. Not, not maybe not totally flipping on its head. But it’s creating a whole paradigm. A new context or paradigm for entertainment, and how that can get made. And people are finding, they can do it in their own home with their phones, even. And same with books, like, you know, if an editor didn’t like your manuscript, and no one is ever going to read your book. Now, you can publish it yourself on Kindle. And if it’s a good book, people will buy it. And so, the same thing is happening with porn. So, rather than dealing with the industry itself, people are finding ways to create their own. I guess ,we call it pornography. When you know, their own content in ways that’s focused on sexuality. And there’s platforms that allow you to market, and sell that, and develop a fanbase, and sustain yourself. And so, the, in this, in one way there, I can imagine that a lot, that there would be people that would praise this. It’s like, “Oh, It’s like empowering. It’s like providing self sufficiency.” And you know, there’s that, as well. And so, and that’s the direction that a lot of these things, that this world porn is going towards. Because it’s just so much better as a, as a geeky called a content creator. Where you can do it on your own. You get your own film crew, even. Or your own camera person. And you don’t, and I, imagine, you know, I don’t know how the numbers work out. But imagine cutting out a lot of the other people involved in production. That the margins are better. So, you take away more. As, as the talent and of it. And this is, you know, there’s a lot of things that lend itself to.

Andrew Love: Well, can we, can I ask you? To clarify. Since, we’re still kind of at the beginning here. To say, you know, there is a platform that Sammy was telling me about. That I didn’t know about. Which is like Facebook of sorts. And what it does is it encourages individuals to upload sexual content of themselves into this platform. And if they get followers, followers can then subscribe and give them money. So, the more people that follow them and give them money, the richer they are. And this is not like.

Sammy Uyama: This is a subscription model, right? It’s like, you have closed, you’ve closed access to content. You should pay access. So yeah, so it’s like, if you want to get at the behind the scenes access to content, then you have to subscribe on a monthly basis. And then, I mean, there’s also like, tipping and things like that. And I’m sure like special and you know, there’s like special requests involved. It’s like when you become a subscriber, then you can get access to the creator and communicate with them. Make requests to things.

Andrew Love: Sure. Okay. So then, this exists. And, and it’s not chump change, either, right? You were talking about some figures and the amount of money that you can make apparently is astronomical, in some cases. So, wanted to get into that as well. Because when you hear this stuff, you have to understand why, why aren’t people doing this? Right? Why, why would anybody in 20 years ago, 30 years ago, it would be unfathomable to, to know somebody who’s in porn, right? And that especially they wouldn’t be proud of it. If you found somebody like, your, your cousin or something, it would be like this dark, this dark spot in your family’s history that, “Oh my god. Did you hear so and so’s in porn? Oh, that’s terrible.” Everybody would be hurt by that fact. Whereas, what’s happening here is it’s like mainstreaming the idea of sexualizing yourself to the public, right? This is a completely different mentality towards porn. That’s what we’re seeing here. This is one of the big factors is there legitimising sexualizing, like sexualizing yourself out of profit. Okay? So, that’s what we’re seeing. And then, we have to figure out well, what are the components here? Why, why is this happening? First of all, why is this happening? Well, because it’s not enough to say all this is wrong. There’s so many people that say, “Oh. This is wrong, people should stop.” Like, “Okay?” Right? “People should stop doing drugs.” Okay, thanks. Yes, that’s great. Why do people do drugs? What’s the reward of doing drugs? And the same with this, why are people uploading themselves having sex? You know, why are they doing this at a young age, right? So, we want to get into the details of what. And then, we’ll and then, we’ll go down this rabbit hole. So, Sammy, give us a more deep details.

Sammy Uyama: Sure is a rabbit hole. I’m still wrapping my head around it. So, it’s like trying to tell a concise narrative. This is, is really challenging, at this point. It’s like and so, part, and say though, why, right? Why so quickly? I think that’s a good direction to go. So, you know, you, you’ve been talking about porn 2.0 for a while. And it’s just the inevitable direction of pornography consumption is this kind of like direct contact with between an audience and a creator. And so, that’s gonna happen eventually. But I think, what, and why so quickly is because in many ways how 2020 has escalated timeline on a lot of stuff. So, imagine just the situation that a lot of people find themselves in. Where you’re attractive 20 year old person, and you suddenly are out of a job or it’s really hard to find a job or your school is closed. And you know, you need to do something to make money. So, you’re looking at what options are available. And suddenly you find something where you can make a lot of money in a really short amount of time. And the only catch is that you have to willing, be willing to be naked on camera, right? Yeah. And then, you feel so bad after you get what, if when you’re desperate.

Andrew Love: Well, not even when you’re desperate. I mean.

Sammy Uyama: Not even desperate. Yeah.

Andrew Love: So, the, the, the lead up to this was, okay, you have an over pornified culture where just everybody’s watching porn, right? Young people are raised on this stuff. So, it’s just a normal part of life. It’s not, “Hey, do you watch porn?” It’s like, “Hey, what kind of porn do you watch?” Right? There’s that compounded with the, you know, the peer pressure that starts in sometimes Elementary School, for sure. Middle School. For sure, for sure, for sure, High School. When a guy likes a girl, he won’t reach out and grab her hand anymore. He’ll reach out for his phone and ask her for a picture of herself naked. There’s so much pressure on young ladies, especially to give nude photos of themselves to people that they barely even know. This isn’t like a real big problem in High Schools, for sure. But like I said, in Middle Schools and Elementary Schools even. So then, you have already this sense of pressure that that’s what is expected of you. That’s a part of your value is are you willing to put out in this way to make people happy, right?

Sammy Uyama: And then, yeah. I mean, now that you mentioned that. It’s, so, if you’ve grown up the past 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 years of your life with that pressure, then it normalizes it. And then, the, then it just makes sense in that situation to, to at least try to make money off of that. It’s like, “Well, damn. I’ve been, I’ve been feeling the pressure to put out in like, so to speak these kinds of photos, right? To, you know, to satisfy this boy I like. Then, well, I can actually make a lot of money doing that. Yeah, I already have the photos, anyway.”

Andrew Love: And then, you compound that with what you just told me, celebrity endorsements. So then, you have child stars. Like this is always how it is, right? You said there’s a, which she’s a Disney star?

Sammy Uyama: Right? Yeah, yeah. So, it’s like, you know that somehow this came on the radar for me was a one, one actress slash models, you know, slash singer slash songwriter. Seems like everyone in Hollywood is doing lots of things that they never just one thing. But they’re always like a producer slash singer, songwriter, slash models, you know. Anyway, one of those who was always popular on Disney, right? You know, your normal Disney star. And Even Stevens or Boy Meets World or any of those other Disney shows, right? And, she set like some she set a record like within 24 hours of signing up for this website. She earned this is a real number. A million dollars in commissions here. And in her first 24 hours, not even like a 24 hour period, but like. She was never on. She never had a profile. She’s never on this platform. She was like, “Oh. Let me make an account.” People find out about it. And she brought in million dollars in commissions for the first 24 hours in $2 million in less than a week.

Andrew Love: What you’re doing is you’re creating this, this perfect storm for like, kind of like an ‘of course’ response. Of course, like, my heroes doing it, right? And she’s making a lot of money. And she’s like me. I want to be like her. So, it only makes sense. She’s okay. She’s not a bad person, right? She’s empowered. She knows what she’s doing. And she’s doing it for the right reason. So, it only makes sense that I do it, too. And when celebrities do it, I mean, that’s why, that’s influencer marketing is. “Well, they’re doing it. And that makes sense. So, I could do it too, right?” That’s, that’s marketing. So, you have all these ingredients. You have, the just totally misinformation from porn and just inundated misinformation. Compounded with pressure to be a certain way online. Compounded with the possibility of a whole lot of rewards, financially, mixed in with everybody’s doing it anyway. So, if I don’t do it, I’m missing out. Not even like, “Should I? Shouldn’t I” It’s like, I’m missing out if I don’t do this, because the momentum is kind of going in this direction. So, that’s, that’s pretty crazy. I mean, that’s pretty hard. From from a young person’s perspective, especially during all this quarantine time. You know, there’s so many mixed emotions that are not being dealt with. Of course, you want a lot of people to tell you that you’re beautiful or handsome or whatever. You want that validation, right? Because you’re stuck inside. I don’t, it makes so much sense, right? Like I don’t agree with it remotely. I think, its the worst possible thing you do. But I understand it. For sure, I understand why young person would do this.

Sammy Uyama: And that’s, that’s the real danger of  it. It’s not like extremism that we should be watching out for, right? Maybe. It’s like, that’s exactly, that, that was the, the danger of communism, if I remember correct. Where just, like you looked at it on paper and it just made sense. Like, why not? Right? And the same thing here. Same thing here. It’s like, yeah, if you look at the context and all the ingredients, you put it together, it’s like, “Yeah. Well, of course. This is the way we’re going.” And it’s not, the platform doesn’t matter. It’s just like, the, it’s an attitude, right? And a direction that, a cultural direction that we’re moving towards. And when, and I’m still trying to think about like, what are the implications? And what is exactly, not the implications, but like, what is impacting what? Because it seems like they go back and forth, or like an energy charge. Or in other words, like they, it like cycles through and through and, and energizes itself more and more. It’s like, the, I think this kind of stuff really creates a casualizes. If that’s a word. Casualizes, nudity and sex, right? And then, so it becomes more normal to do. But then, the more that, the more normalized it becomes, the more you do it. Then of course, then naturally, it becomes more casual, even, even more. Right? And then, the more something is objectified then the more you justify objectifying it. And the more you, you know. So, I don’t, it’s like I don’t know, which come from, which came first, actually.

Andrew Love: Yeah. It’s just the slowly erosion of standards and values and expectations, right? If you expect that, that’s, that’s the best, your best possible outcome. I think our heart is naturally always scanning scenarios for what’s the most guaranteed way of getting love, right now. That’s a very natural thing. And if, and if you don’t really have many options, then this is almost like a guarantee. You’ll get some sort of validation. And it will feel good for a little period of time. But what I’m observing is, it seems like the price here is this, you give a little piece of your soul and your dignity every time you do this. I mean, you not, these people who are watching you doing something very, extremely intimate don’t care about you. If you, if you, if you left the platform, they would look for somebody else. You’re just another face. You’re just fitting into their fantasy for a short period of time. So, they don’t care about you, per se. They’re not invested in your health, mental health, physical health, spiritual health. So, they’re just, they’re taking as much as you’re willing to give. And it seems like people are giving more and more of themselves for less and less, right? Like so, before it’s like you wouldn’t really want people that necessarily see you in a, in a bathing suit so much like all over the internet. Unless you’re like, you know, super attractive and you just want to show off for a little bit. But the average person would kind of save pictures of themselves scantily clad for, for only close friends and relatives, right? But that, that became Instagram. Well, I’m just saying. Like, if you look at the early days of Facebook, people weren’t posting pictures of themselves in bikinis you can look, right? It just like, you know, like a headshot. Or just like very, you know, common, common pictures. And then, Instagram became such a visual, you know, platform that incentivize people to get more attention. And how are you going to get more attention than showing more skin, right? In terms of a visual thing, or doing something great. Jumping off a skyscraper or something like that. But typically, yeah, what dominates Instagram is very nearly naked women. For the most part, right? And then, what’s beyond that is just, yeah, full nudity and sex. But the rewards are the same. It’s like the erosion of outcome. Because you don’t get more, the more you give, right? You can make millions of dollars off Instagram as well, just like you can make millions of dollars of this. So, it’s like the same reward. Externally, material reward. But you’re giving more of your soul to get that. Does that make sense? So, it’s kind of like you’re losing more to get the same amount. And that’s where this is all taking us. Because imagine the more people that get on this platform, the harder it is going to be to make money off of it. So, you’re going to be doing the same amount of losing your dignity, but you’re going to be making less money. If you consider that an exchange, right?

Sammy Uyama: Another thing that I just thought of when you’re talking about this is a cross pollination. Or I don’t recall but cross platforming. And that you become less competitive and things like in other social media platforms like Instagram or Tiktok, right? It’s a big one right now. And that like, like, you’re talking about this, this social clout. That’s like the real currency. Influence. That word influence that’s like, what people are really looking for. And even, if that’s like, you know, you know ever had any goal to, like a point, be a sex star, porn star. Right? But you just wanted to be an Instagram star and have influence. And if that’s your niche is like hotness. And you just want to be like a hot person Instagram and develop influence. You, it’s like people are like, that’s like the gateway Instagram. And then, people want more. Right? So, they’re like, “Okay, yeah. This is where you put your bikini stuff.” But where do you put like the rea,l the real juice, right? It’s like Middle School. At home, she’s like this middle school. Now, it’s the same. And it doesn’t stop, actually. Where it’s like, if, if you become unwilling to do the graphic stuff, the nude stuff, then people will look elsewhere and they’ll lose interest. So, you’ll lose traction. Even on like the more mainstream platforms.  I met. I recognize that happening. I think, that’s really the future direction is going to go in.

Andrew Love: Okay, yeah. I knew you were suggesting that before. Was that a hypothetical? Or was that something that you read that more and more content creators outside of sex are being pressured by their fans to give them more sexy stuff?

Sammy Uyama: Yeah. No. That’s real. So, people are. Okay, TikTok. That’s what I was specifically talking about. So, TiKTok. It’s, it’s more innocent. Still, then. It’s not so blatantly sexualized, right? Because it’s, it’s still geared towards teens, at least at the time of this recording. And so, they’re these like, Star, TikTok stars, and you know, posting 10 second dance clips or lip synching things, right? And they’re having their, they become super popular. And they’re having people post like, “Hey. Hey. Great stuff. You have only fans account. You have only fans account.” And so like, these famous TikTok, TikTok stars, they had no idea what this is. Like, “Only fans, what’s that?” And like, then they look into it. Like, “Oh, wow. That’s what that is.” And then, you know, the kind of piques their curiosity. And so, they dabble in it. And then, they get immediate traction, because they’ve got, they’ve got, like foundation on this other platform. Right? They’ve got a fan base already. So, kind of converts over to the more explicit stuff for the people who want that. And, you know, this is one example, one interview. And this is becoming more and more popular. Where popular content producers, people are asking, like, “Hey, where’s your only fans? When you get to make an only fans?” And so, this is like, it’s, it’s just like Middle School, like you’re saying, right? It’s this, this pressure to, to, but it’s, it’s, it’s more enticing than that. Because it’s like, in middle school, if you don’t, you’re just losing. Right? Like, there’s the fear of losing something. But with this, there’s also this huge plus side, right? So like, there’s the fear of like losing interest attraction with your fans. And then, going somewhere else. When there’s also the huge, like, crazy amount of money that can be earned. And that’s like, really tempting.

Andrew Love: Yeah. Money. It’s a tempter. For sure. Yeah. And so, all this is happening, unbeknownst to so many parents, right? I just, at this point, if you know about this Disney star. I mean, her parents must know about it. And it’s very interesting. Porn becomes much more egregious. The further the distance you have between you and porn. So, when you stop watching it, you’re like, “Whoa. This stuff was really getting to me, right?” But while you’re in it, it just, it all just seems kind of relative. It’s like, “Ah. It’s not that bad. Whatever.” Right? People are, in a sense, in a trance. And they just don’t see. They don’t see it. They don’t see it as clearly until they get out of it. And they’re like, “Oh, my God.” Because, you know, everything that I’ve read from people who are, who were in the porn industry. Who left the industry. Had a completely different perspective, when they were out of it. When they were in it. When they’re creating foreign content, they had to find a way to justify it. Otherwise, they would have killed themselves. Or it would have just been unbearable, right? So, they mentally just have to find ways to make it okay. But as soon as they left, they started to see. “Wow, this is really messed up. I was really being abused. I was really being manipulated.” Right? And then, if you have an entire generation of people who are then going into this. I can’t imagine what it’s going to be when they come out of it. Because there’s a clear end to it. People are not going to continue to make these self generated porn contents when they’re in their 40s, 50s, 60s, 70s, 80s. It’s just not gonna happen. Right? And a lot of people say, “Oh. Well, maybe there’ll be a niche for that.” Yeah, maybe. But how’s that working out on Instagram? How are the, how the 65 year old models doing on Instagram? You know, wrinkles are not appreciated on such superficial platforms, right? So, same goes for the porn industry. It does not favor the elderly. So, what’s going to happen when you get chewed up and spat out of the other side of this? I mean, it’s, it’s just, it’s soul crushing, right? And then, if you have, it was always in the margins. Porn was always in the margins. The people that were in porn. I bet you most people, probably everybody who’s listening to this podcast, doesn’t know a single person who’s been in a porn movie, right? But that’s going to really change in the coming years. That a lot of people that you know will have been in self made porn that’s out there. And what that does to a person? Good gravy, I don’t even, I don’t even want to think about it. You know, we’re gonna have to really deal with that when it comes.

Sammy Uyama: Yeah. It’s mind-blowing. You know, one, another, another impact of this is that the whole narrative of porn and sex is going to be changing drastically. Because of this, you know. And we just published the interview that you did with Patrick Erlandsson about the dirty, the dark side of the porn industry. And its connection to Kim trafficking, right?  And the coercion, it’s evolved in the porn industry. And, and, and people are discovering more and more how really dirty it is. And that’s becoming a huge turnoff for them wanting to engage in that. And so, things like even ethical porn is becoming a thing. And people are looking for that. And you know, what kind of, what a, it’s such a tempting narrative to go to, along with idea of people creating their own content. And how empowering it must be, for these young artists, to these women who don’t have to deal with bullying of a director. Who pressures them to do a scene that, you know, they weren’t expecting when they showed up on set. And, you know, they call their own shots. And then, they’re, their own boss. And it’s like a whole, it really, I can imagine it, white washing, or the I don’t know, that’s our word. Or bleaching, whatever. We’re making the whole world of sex production or porn production, making a look look a lot cleaner.

Andrew Love: Well, to be honest, it could. I mean, you never know. It’s like in terms of the direct abuse from another person during the making of porn. That might reduce, right? If you get the directors out of there, right? But it will not get rid of the social pressures and the abuse that you will get online. Right? Because as you can tell, the studies that they’ve done about porn is that porn is like 80% plus misogynistic. And so, there will be so many comments from the so-called fans of these, these self producing content creators to do stuff that’s degrading to them. To do stuff that they don’t want to do. And they’ll end up doing it out of pressure. Especially when you have a lineup. An ever growing lineup of people that you’re comparing yourself to. Who are doing more and more risky stuff, or crazy stuff to get attention. Of course, that’s going to incentivize more and more risky behavior. That’s just how it is, right? So, you’re gonna, it’s gonna have the same result of people doing very regrettable things. And it’s going to be largely men pressuring woman. And it’s not going to come in the form of a male director, you know. And Patrick, Patrick went into great detail about one such scenario on the set of a porn studio, right? Of a director doing some really crazy manipulative things to the female actress. But if you can imagine, the same thing is going to happen at scale from social pressure. It’s already happening on mass in social media. Pressure to be somebody you’re not. And that’s creating a huge amount of stress and anxiety in the souls and hearts of people, right? But you compound that with these carnal desires of sex, it’s gonna be bananas. And I’m telling you, it’s like, it’s gonna be men, largely pressuring woman, bullying woman to do things that they don’t want to do. But it’s not, they won’t go from, you know, stage one level. You know, risky behavior to stage 10, because they’re pressured. It’s this gradual erosion of their sense of value that will allow for them to do stuff that they never thought they would ever do. And they’ll, in the, while they’re producing it, they will justify it because they have to. Because that’s what we do. We die if we can’t justify. But then afterwards, the thing is what happens next. That’s what I’m very curious. If this is already happening. And could you get into the stats about how many people are signing up for this platform? Because this is, again, it’s not like this, we are, there’s a mass migration towards this phenomena. That’s the crazy thing. So, what, what are the stats?

Sammy Uyama: So, yeah. The thing is start booming because people are at home. Right? And, and I guess, it’s getting, for whatever reasons, contractions. So, it’s getting traction. And so, they’ve got a, as of what July I think, they’ve tracked 200,000 new daily users. And about  7000 to 8000 new daily creators on this platform. So, daily basis.

Andrew Love: There are 200,000 people joining per day?

Sammy Uyama: Oh, yeah.

Andrew Love: Yeah. Okay, that’s way different. I thought you meant that there’s only 200,000 people that use it every day. But you’re saying that there’s an additional 200,000 people joining every single day?

Sammy Uyama: Yeah. Every single day. Like so, I think, this, you, it’s not like an open thing. It’s a, it’s, you have to create a profile to get access and to be able to begin using this platform. Right? So, it’s 200,000 new people joining every day plus 8000 content creators.

Andrew Love: Yeah. 8000 new people making their own porn. 8000 newly minted porn actors and actresses. Every day. You have, like, those numbers are insane. You know, every day somebody a newbie. I don’t know, out of those 8000 how many of them have made porn of themselves before and how many of them new are new. But I’m guessing, there’s not a massive migration from established porn actresses. And, you know, like, these people, in many ways are already being forced. And they have pimps or people lording over them, right? So, it’s not just like, they’re like entrepreneurs that can just have the freedom to create their own account. But there’s, there’s a large number of these people are like, this is the first time they’re they’re doing this kind of stuff. That’s a massive number. That’s a crazy number. Good guy. And so, I mean, a good question is for everybody out there as it let’s say, as a young person, what do you think about this? You know, how do you feel about looking to the left and looking to the right, and seeing this migration of people your age, going to this platform making part of themselves? It’s really good to start thinking about generating an opinion or, you know, trying to form an opinion now. And as parents, what do you think? Because it’s never, it’s never good enough to just react. That reaction doesn’t help anybody. If you freak out. If you run around saying the world’s on fire. It’s not. I mean, clearly, this is messed up. But then, what? What, what do we do about this? I mean, there’s a lot of unanswered questions, right? I mean, like, we don’t really know that. Do you have access to the data, I think?

Sammy Uyama: No. I mean, I don’t, there’s a lot about this. I don’t know. There’s just stuff I’ve read. And then, a lot of speculation as well. I still don’t know. And what to do about it? Gosh, that’s another thing. Yeah, I think, more so than ever. The sex, that’s like really what the focus is. It’s not enough to just poopoo porn as an industry, right? That’s all it needs to get exposed, for sure. But people’s relationship with sex and what the role of sex is meant to play in our lives. That’s something that people are not clear on. So, I, just I, that’s the thing, I feel the burn to really champion and help people realize that. Because I think, once you get clear on that, then the pieces start to fall to line up. Right? It begins to make sense. What, kind of what ,what path should I go down? Rather than trying to address each piece, individually?

Andrew Love: This is ,this is the trend. This is, this is the thing that we all saw. Kind of see it heading in this direction. We’re going there. It’s happening right now. And then, the point is, a lot of it goes back to what Patrick Erlandsson was saying. Is that, you know, trafficking comes down to, if you could distill it to two main factors, its entitlement and its vulnerability. So, for vulnerability, it’s people get into trafficking when, when they’re not being protected. And I would say, very similarly, you know, with something like this. If a young person has no connection with their parents, and they can’t see their conscience is asleep. Because they’ve stranglehold it with porn and they just don’t have access to reason and long term perspectives. Because they’re not having these deep conversations with their parents. Then, then it makes it easier for them to just react and follow the herd. Right? And but also, entitlement is this, looking, listen to that ratio 8000 new content creators a day are being, are joining this platform. And 200,000, people who want to see them and their creation. So, that’s entitlements. 200,000 people a day who feel entitled to seeing somebody naked. Even though, you don’t know why somebody is creating this content. Are they suffering, and they just really need a hug, but they’re willing to settle for showing themselves doing these crazy sexual acts, right? So, entitlement and vulnerability are two huge factors in this. And that’s something, that we can contribute to for sure. Just as like an immediate proactive step. Can we talk to our kids? If you have kids. On a regular basis. And let them know that they’re amazing and powerful. And that they don’t need anybody else’s validation. That they are already, you know, like, let them experience God’s love. And if you are a young person, to, to understand where do you get your validation and your value and look for organic sources? And also, how entitled do you feel when it comes to sex? To look at these things, right? Those are immediate steps that we can take, because it’s, people usually want to, like destroy the machine, right? Let’s kill this website. Let’s destroy it. As though, that’s gonna solve the problem. The problem is, people are disconnected from their value, right? And they’re willing to get such a diluted version of love. As you know, somebody’s giving you five bucks for showing them everything. You know, that’s really meant to be reserved for somebody who’s committed to loving you eternally. They’re willing to give it to some creep, who gives them five bucks. Like, let’s just help each other out, you know. Because we can’t stop this machine. The machines there. And if you kill that machine, another machine is gonna come. It’s more, how do we help people experience the love of God.

Sammy Uyama: Very well put. So, I guess, that’s uh, that’s it. Thank you for joining me and Andrew down are our brain-picking. We’re in a lot of ways figuring this out, ourselves. So, this was an exercise for us to clarify our own opinions and thoughts on this. And we hope was clarifying for you, as well. And this is definitely something we’ll continue talking about. You know, we’re just scratching the surface. And we’re really good to hear from you, if you have any ideas or insights. So, feel free to reach out. Contact us. Let us know what you think. And yeah, let’s love each other up. What a great message. I know.

Andrew Love: Yeah. Awesome. Thank you guys for listening. We want to hear your thoughts. We want you to help inform our opinions, too. Because I’m sure many of you have already considered this. So, we love hearing from you contact us. Go to our website. Figure out how to contact us. And we will get back to you. Okay, thank you for listening. We’ll talk to you next time.

 

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